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BUGLE ROCK

Bugle Rock is a massive rock in the Basavanagudi area of South Bangalore, Karnataka. It is an abrupt rise above the ground of peninsular gneiss as the main rock formation and with an assessed age of about 3,000 million years. Bugle Rock has generated wide interest among the scientific community.



Kempe Gowda II (who came to power in 1585), the feudal ruler of Bangalore, is credited with building four watchtowers setting limits for Bangalore's expansion, which included a tower on the Bugle Rock (on the southern boundary) as it commands a panoramic view of Bangalore city. It is said that at sunset a sentry would blow the bugle and hold a torch (Kannada:panju) which was visible from the other three watch towers (one on the southern bank of the Kempambudi tank on the west, the second near Ulsoor Lake in the east and the third tower adjoining Ramana Maharshi Ashram on Bellary Road, namely Mekhri Circle in the north). This was done to inform people that everything was safe at that location and to give a warning bugle call to alert the citizens of any intruders into the city. Most of the rocks on the Bugle Rock, next to the Bull Temple, have hollows, which were once used to light lamps. This landmark spreads over an area of 16 acres (6.5 ha). This rock is contiguous and similar to the rock at Lalbagh tower.

Amidst the natural rock formations, a small park with waterfalls and fountains has been developed as one of the green lungs of the garden city of Bangalore, which is frequented visited by children, families and the elderly. The park houses three temples. The densely tree-lined park developed by the Horticulture Department of the Government of Karnataka is considered a "walkers paradise" since over 750 to 1000 visitors (70% of them senior citizens) visit the park every day. One can also hear calls of a number of bats perched on the trees. An amphitheatre, which can accommodate 300 people, has been developed in the precincts of the park. The Hindu temple Dodda Basavana Gudi or Bull Temple, said to be the biggest temple to Nandi (the bull referred to as a sacred Hindu demi-god) in the world, and a Ganesha temple are in the limits of the park. According to an inscription in the Bull Temple, a spring beneath the Nandi is the source of the Vrishabhavathi River, which flows to the west of Bangalore.

During the Third Mysore War, a contingent of the Mysore army, regrouped in this rock area under the leadership of Mir Khammar-ud-din before attacking the British Army.