Kempegowda Museum, Bangalore

Kempegowda Museum is a government museum located in MG Road, Bangalore, Karnataka. Kempegowda Museum was established in the year 2011 is dedicated to Yelahanka chieftain Kempegowda (1513-1569) who is the founder of Bangalore city. The museum is located on the first floor of Mayo Hall. The museum has Kempegowda's statue as well as posters and pictures of forts, temples, reservoirs and inscriptions from his time.

The Kempe Gowda Museum is housed is the first floor of the heritage building of Mayo Hall. The building has been painted in the Cantonment colors of red and white. Mayo Hall's upper storey was earlier reserved for public meetings free of charge while the ground floor housed the municipal offices. Until the year 2010, the Mayor of Bangalore's meetings were held on the first floor. The adjoining blocks of the building which were built in 1904, now house a variety of courts and public offices were previously referred to as 'station public offices'. When a visitor enters the building, they can view the floor plan of the museum's first floor gallery. The impressive wooden stairs that lead to museum have old paintings of Bangalore and its nearby forts, made by British surveyors.

An interesting experience of the museum is the floor. Visitors to the museum will actually be walking on a magnified heritage map of 19th century Bangalore.[3] The map is spread across the wooden floor and laminated with a glass slab. The map has been procured from the Mythic Society and is drawn by the British. One can locate and view old names of places and buildings of Bangalore city. The huge floor map shows the east-west zones of the city. One gets to walk over the map while viewing various exhibits on display.

A small statue depicting Kempegowda in Savanadurga has been placed at the entrance of the museum. The museum has an imposing fibreglass statue of Kempegowda place in the center of the hall on the first floor. The statue is placed in a manner that it appears to be welcoming visitors with its hands folded in a traditional Indian way. The museum also throws light on the Yelahanka clan that Kempegowda belonged to, the lineage of the Kempegowda family, their successors and has displays of the rulers of the dynasty. The foundation of Bangalore town, the commerce, water systems and religious agraharas (hamlets) built by the clan.

A background of 16th-century Bangalore and photographs of the city can be found. Many pictures of Kempegowda's territories,the forts, temples and water reservoirs built by him are displayed and are supported by historical facts and inscriptions displayed on the wall.